Is a Bag Enough?

Is a Bag Enough?

Trauma scene flights are often the first thing people think of when they think of Helicopter EMS. Although we know that HEMS and Critical Care Transport involves much more than just scene flights, they are still a critical part of most HEMS programs’ mission and capabilities. In addition, many flights are “modified scenes” or “scene intercepts,” meaning the HEMS crew meets the EMS crew at an outlying hospital helipad, or arrives shortly after the patient’s arrival to an under-resourced ED. Many of these patients are critically ill, and a subset will require intubation and ventilation. Once intubated is bag valve ventilation enough? Or should all these patient’s be placed on a mechanical ventilator?

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Tidal Volume Strategies for those without ARDS

Tidal Volume Strategies for those without ARDS

 Invasive ventilation is one of the most frequently applied interventions utilized for critically ill patients.  However, as with all medical interventions, there are potential risks and harms which must be balanced with perceived benefit.  As our understanding of physiology grows, we have found more and more potential harms associated with invasive mechanical ventilation. This review of a recent article published in JAMA explores the impact of different tidal volume strategies for patients who do not have ARDS.

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The Head and the Heart: Hemodynamic Derangement in Isolated TBI

The Head and the Heart: Hemodynamic Derangement in Isolated TBI

We know that alterations in hemodynamics do not only occur in hemorrhagic shock.  Both obstructive (such as from tension pneumothorax) and neurogenic shock (for example, from a spinal cord transection), can result in hemodynamic compromise that would not be corrected by blood product administration.  There have been some studies that have shown isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI) can also cause hemodynamic derangements. This article looks at a paper which attempts to examine the incidence of cardiovascular instability in patients with TBI.

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Air Care Series: Cardiogenic Shock

Air Care Series: Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic shock presents many challenges in both the transport environment and hospital setting. We aim to review the current state of evidence pertaining to the medical management in the critical care transport environment.

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Air Care Orientation Case #1

Air Care Orientation Case #1

This is Case #1 of our Air Care Orientation Curriculum!  This curriculum is designed to help prepare our rising R2's for their new responsibility as flight physicians.  These cases are discussed amongst our training flight docs and this is the resultant learning points.  In this case, we discuss a sick trauma patient that needs multiple interventions.  But what interventions need to be done?  In what order?  And who should do them?  Read on to find out!

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Protect Me! "Flights" #4 Recap

Protect Me! "Flights" #4 Recap

Welcome to the Final Recap of our “Flights” Case Series!

Thanks to all those who participated in the discussion and to those who tuned into the “Flights” cases throughout the spring and summer.  The final "Flights" cases centered in on several challenging airway scenarios.  Penetrating neck trauma with a tracheal injury; GSW to the face with significantly altered anatomy; and a tracheostomy displaced and a patient with critical hypoxia - airway management in the field requires a nimble mind and knowledge of one's own equipment.  Take a look at our thoughts on the cases and see what you might do in similar situations.

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"Protect Me" - Flights Case 4

"Protect Me" - Flights Case 4

Welcome to the Fourth Case in our Air Care and Mobile Care Flight Orientation Curriculum for 2016! 

It is a beautiful sunny Memorial Day and you arrive early for your C-pod shift, energized by the knowledge that you will be getting out early with time to enjoy the day. Your patients are an enjoyable mix of pathology and acuity and everyone is quite polite and gracious. The tones drop just before it is time to hand over the radio to the dedicated flight doc and you can’t but marvel at your good fortune. You grab the blood and head up to the helipad for your flight...

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Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 2

Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 2

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Dustin Calhoun, Associate Director of the UC Division of EMS, as well as two of this year’s UC EMS Fellows, Dr. Mike Bohanske and Dr. Justin Benoit.

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Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 1

Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 1

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Dustin Calhoun, Associate Director of the UC Division of EMS, as well as two of this year’s UC EMS Fellows, Dr. Mike Bohanske and Dr. Justin Benoit.

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Pre-Hospital Trauma Care – Lessons Learned From the Front

Pre-Hospital Trauma Care – Lessons Learned From the Front

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Jay Johannigman, Chief of the Division of Trauma and Critical Care at the University of Cincinnati.  Dr. Johannigman has over thirty years of military experience which includes 6 deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.  Dr. Johannigman joined us to discuss how the military experience has changed civilian trauma care in the United States.    

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Pre-Hospital STEMI Care

Pre-Hospital STEMI Care

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Tim Smith, an Interventional Cardiologist and Director of the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.  Dr. Smith joined us to discuss our region’s partnership with the American Heart Association’s Mission Lifeline program to bring a regionalized system of care for STEMI patients to our area.  

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Pre-Hospital Stroke Care

Pre-Hospital Stroke Care

Pre-hospital stroke care begins with a quick, simple assessment tool used to help identify patients that are suffering a stroke.  In Southwest Ohio, this tool is the Cincinnati Pre-hospital Stroke Scale (CPSS).  There are three simple components of the CPSS – facial droop, arm drift, and slurred speech.  When assessing for facial droop, it is best to ask patients to bear their teeth.  Arm drift is assessed by asking the patient to hold both arms outstretched in front of them with their palms facing up.  If one arm drifts down or one hand rotates to a palm-down position, this aspect of the scale is positive.  Lastly, ask the patient to repeat a sentence to assess for slurred speech or any other type of speech abnormality.

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Grey Matters - Flights Case 3

Grey Matters - Flights Case 3

It is late on a blustery grey and rainy day in November and you are the dedicated flight doc on Air Care One (the “UH”) nearing the end of your shift. Your pilot has had to turn down two flights already due to high winds and reduced visibility as bands of storms moved through the area. Against your better judgment, you are standing in the sushi line in the hospital cafeteria to grab dinner when you hear “Air Care One Pilot, weather check for a patient coming back to the U” squawk out over your portable radio. Your excitement rises as “we can do that” echoes over the radio and you hear the tones drop for your flight. You grab the blood cooler and meet your crew for takeoff on the roof...

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A Look into the Code STEMI - Flights Case 2 Recap

A Look into the Code STEMI - Flights Case 2 Recap

It’s true that sometimes critical care transport missions to transport STEMI patients to PCI are fairly uneventful.  But if we allow ourselves to get lulled into a “Milk Run” mindset, it will most definitely come back to bite us.  The jovial, normotensive, fairly comfortable-appearing STEMI patient may be only a couple of minutes away from V Fib arrest or florid cardiogenic shock.  When that occurs, if we have expected and prepared for such a complication, it’s likely that we’ll be able to manage it successfully.

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