Grey Matters - Recap of Flights Case 3

Grey Matters - Recap of Flights Case 3

Welcome to the Recap of the 3rd case in our Air Care and Mobile Care Flight Orientation Curriculum!

Approximately 1 month ago we presented and talked through a particularly challenging patient flight scenario.  As a refresher, if you don’t recall, check out the post here.  Following the posting of the case, I sat down with ACMC Medical Director Dr. Bill Hinckley and Resident Assistant Medical Director for Air Care, Dr. Andrew Latimer, and recorded a podcast with their reaction to the case and to some of the curveball scenarios posed in the question and discussion section.

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Peer-Peer Community Building: One of the Strongest Preventers of Burn-Out

Peer-Peer Community Building: One of the Strongest Preventers of Burn-Out

It’s nearing the end of the year, when the fourth years are moving on to real paychecks or slightly improved with fellowship, and everyone else is preparing for their new roles ahead.  The end of the academic year can feel like a period of stagnation and possibly regret.  Fear not, however, there are easy solutions and ways to prevent burn-out, the term people like to say frequently to EM physicians.  I’m not burned out! I’m just toasty sometimes!

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Clinical Concepts in CT Imaging of the Chest

Clinical Concepts in CT Imaging of the Chest

A 45 yo Female presents to the ED with sudden onset of chest pain, described as worse when taking a deep breath.  She is significantly short of breath and appears distressed.  She recently underwent a total right knee arthroplasty and reports having been bedridden secondary to pain.  Physical exam is remarkable for a right lower extremity with surgical incisions that clean, dry, intact; however, her left lower extremity is swollen with significant tenderness along the popliteal fossa and calf.  

Vitals: Temp 99.2HR 120RR: 28 BP:  130/80 SpO2 90% on RA.

A CTPA is ordered...

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Grand Rounds Recap 5/18

Grand Rounds Recap 5/18

In this week's grand rounds we covered the complications of sedation in alcohol withdrawl, the nuances of decreased door-to-needle time in acute ischemic stroke, bicarbinate use in metabolic acidosis and a case follow-up or respiratory depression in new onset myesthenia gravis

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Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 2

Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 2

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Dustin Calhoun, Associate Director of the UC Division of EMS, as well as two of this year’s UC EMS Fellows, Dr. Mike Bohanske and Dr. Justin Benoit.

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Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 1

Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest - Part 1

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Dustin Calhoun, Associate Director of the UC Division of EMS, as well as two of this year’s UC EMS Fellows, Dr. Mike Bohanske and Dr. Justin Benoit.

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Pre-Hospital Trauma Care – Lessons Learned From the Front

Pre-Hospital Trauma Care – Lessons Learned From the Front

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Jay Johannigman, Chief of the Division of Trauma and Critical Care at the University of Cincinnati.  Dr. Johannigman has over thirty years of military experience which includes 6 deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.  Dr. Johannigman joined us to discuss how the military experience has changed civilian trauma care in the United States.    

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Pre-Hospital STEMI Care

Pre-Hospital STEMI Care

The UC Division of EMS has recorded a series of podcasts to celebrate EMS Week 2016.  We are honored to be able to engage EMS Providers throughout the world with this forum.  If you practice pre-hospital medicine, we would like to say thank you and that we appreciate everything you do to provide a high level of care to ill and injured patients in a wide variety of austere environments.  For this podcast, we were joined by Dr. Tim Smith, an Interventional Cardiologist and Director of the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.  Dr. Smith joined us to discuss our region’s partnership with the American Heart Association’s Mission Lifeline program to bring a regionalized system of care for STEMI patients to our area.  

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Pre-Hospital Stroke Care

Pre-Hospital Stroke Care

Pre-hospital stroke care begins with a quick, simple assessment tool used to help identify patients that are suffering a stroke.  In Southwest Ohio, this tool is the Cincinnati Pre-hospital Stroke Scale (CPSS).  There are three simple components of the CPSS – facial droop, arm drift, and slurred speech.  When assessing for facial droop, it is best to ask patients to bear their teeth.  Arm drift is assessed by asking the patient to hold both arms outstretched in front of them with their palms facing up.  If one arm drifts down or one hand rotates to a palm-down position, this aspect of the scale is positive.  Lastly, ask the patient to repeat a sentence to assess for slurred speech or any other type of speech abnormality.

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Grand Rounds Recap 5/4

Grand Rounds Recap 5/4

Acetaminophen Toxicity Sim - Drs. LaFollette, Nelson and Toth

Take a read through our Cases If It Bleeds it Leads..., Seeing is Believing..., and Belly Pain Bonanza. Curated commentary to follow

Acetaminophen Toxicity

  • 60,000 poisonings / year
  • ~500 deaths per year, evenly split therapeutic / suicide
  • Mechanism - acetaminophen to NAPQI by P450, overwhelming gluthathione stores
  • Alcohol, phenytoin, isoniazid all induce P450 and may increase NAPQI production. Chronic alcohol use will worsen toxicity when acute ingestion will competitively inhibit and can be preventative at producing the toxic metabolite
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Clinical Concepts in Pelvic Ultrasound

Clinical Concepts in Pelvic Ultrasound

Your patient is a well appearing, otherwise healthy 22 year old female who presents with lower abdominal pain x3 days.  She is unsure of her LMP, but thinks she had some spotting about a month ago.  Vital signs: Temp 99.3F, HR 92, BP 102/70, RR 20, 98% on RA.  She has a benign, non-gravid abdomen.  Urine pregnancy is positive.  You fire off a quantitative hCG and don’t expect that result to come back for a while.  What do you do next?  

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Grand Rounds Recap 4/20

Grand Rounds Recap 4/20

Simulation with Dr. Hill

Transitions of care can be a high risk time for our patients, especially amidst the chaotic environment that can be the SRU. 

Pre-planning sign out is an effective strategy to make the transition smooth. One to two hours out from the shift's end, take them time to start getting things in order for the end of the shift.

As emergency medicine physicians we have the tendency to want to wrap up our patients at sign out as nicely as possible. This is a good habit, realizing that it can predispose to premature closure, and, particularly in the case of an unpredictable SRU, should be applied with caution...

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Belly Pain Bonanza

Belly Pain Bonanza

It's been a busy Monday night shift.  2 hours in and it seems like all you've seen is belly pain after belly pain.  You hesitate and think maybe it's just a figment of your imagination but a quick look at the track board tells you nope, 5 patient's with abdominal pain in your 10 bed pod and a new patient arriving to C40 with, of course, abdominal pain.  You meet the squad and get report...

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