Grand Rounds Recap 4.17.19

Grand Rounds Recap 4.17.19

Enjoy this weeks Grand Rounds Summary. We had a great small group session on conflict resolution presented by Dr. McDonough and Leenellett of the leadership curriculum team. Next, Drs. Iparraguirre and Li taught us about an evidence-based approach to epistaxis. We completed our morning going through a great simulation on Acute Myocardial Infarction requiring Thrombolysis with Drs. Colmer, Mckee, Harrison, and Continenza.

Read More

Grand Rounds Recap 11.28.18

Grand Rounds Recap 11.28.18

Check out this week’s recap of Grand Rounds! Dr. Tim Murphy took us through some fascinating cases with Morbidity and Mortality Conference. Next, we got to dive deep into toxicology. Dr. Kelli Jarrell led us through a case she had of a TCA overdose, Dr. Shawn Hassani taught us about Beta Blocker and Calcium Channel Blocker overdose, and Dr. Woods Curry took us through a oral boards session during Quarterly Sim reviewing Aspirin toxicity. Quarterly Simulation also had an oral boards case discussing inferior STEMI complicated by complete heart block, as well as an awesome simulation teaching the fundamentals of teamwork and closed loop communication by having a lucky R3 run a code with a blindfold on. We’re excited to share the learning highlights with you!

Read More

Grand Rounds Recap 3.21.18

Grand Rounds Recap 3.21.18

This week's Grand Rounds opened with year directives focused on residents as teachers for the junior residents and life as a junior faculty for the senior residents. Next Dr. Fermann discussed implementation of our PE response team (PERT). Dr. Li led a great group discussion on EKG toxicology, Dr. Golden then unsuccessfully tried to stump Dr. Hill with his CPC on phenytoin toxicity, and finally Dr. Gorder gave a fantastic discussion on NSTEMIs.

Read More

Flights - Un-Break My Heart

Flights - Un-Break My Heart

It is early October and you are the flight doc in C-pod on a brisk but clear Saturday morning. The day starts out with several challenging patients with vague complaints and has just begun to ramp up in volume when a patient rolls into your pod by EMS, restrained face-down to the cot, covered in feces and urine, screaming about hearing voices. You begin to take report from EMS when, as if by divine intervention, the tones drop and you are dispatched for an inter-facility transfer. You gleefully (almost too gleefully…) give a brief patient sign-out to your staff, grab the blood cooler, and head to the roof...

Read More

Grand Rounds Recap 9/30/2015

Grand Rounds Recap 9/30/2015

September Morbidity and Mortality Conference - Dr. Toth

Cases reviewed were from the month of August. We saw greater volume in 2015 than 2014 with longer ED hold times. We reviewed multiple cases including:

Acute Inflamatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

  • Pain is a common presentation, and cranial nerve palsies are not infrequent, but they usually follow weakness and numbness of the extremeties.
  • The diagnosis is in large part clinical, with progressive areflexia and sensory loss being the hallmarks. CSF studies showing albuminocytologic dissociation is confirmatory.
Read More

Flights - A Pain in My Heart

Flights - A Pain in My Heart

You are the Pod doc overnight on a particularly quiet Sunday night.  You have been looking for an excuse to leave the pod and do anything other than treat abdominal pain for the past several hours when the tones drop.  You thank whatever celestial being you believe in and grab the blood and run out of the department full of glee.  In route to the helipad you are told it is a Code STEMI.  At this point, even that seems more interesting than sitting in C Pod.

You buckle into the helicopter and take a quick flight to the outside hospital.  You grab a set of gloves and unload the cot carefully and walk inside.

Read More