Grand Rounds Recap 2/13/19

Grand Rounds Recap 2/13/19

This week, we started Grand Rounds with ED-critical care research brought to us by UC Alumnus Dr. Brian Fuller. He discusses ventilator management in the ED and how ED sedation may affect patient outcomes. Dr. Harrison then presented an overview and common utilization errors of ED observation from his year as a Resident Assistant Medical Director, followed by Dr. McKee’s case of inhalational chlorine exposure. Dr. Alwan discussed updates to the less than 60 day fever protocol at CCHMC and Dr. Zozula walked through the dispatcher assistance protocols to give us an idea of what happens before they enter the ED doors.

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Grand Rounds Recap 2.14.18

Grand Rounds Recap 2.14.18

This weeks Grand Rounds was started off with our guest lecturer, Dr. Esther Choo, who gave a compelling talk regarding gender disparities in medicine and the effects of gender bias in our profession and every day practice.  This was followed by Dr. Owens and Ventura giving their evidence based approach to the management of A-Fib, as well as previewing their upcoming algorithm for Tamingthesru.com.  Our pediatric EM colleague Dr. Valentino then walked us through current recommendations on the approach to the febrile infant.  In the last hour, Dr. Iparraguirre gave us a lecture on the approach to rashes in the ED.  The conference then concluded with an R4 clinical soap box lecture by Dr. Dang on the history of cannabis and medical marijuana, as well as the research behind its current use.  

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Annals of B-Pod: Approach to the Febrile Infant

Annals of B-Pod: Approach to the Febrile Infant

Imagine it’s your first moonlighting shift at a small rural community hospital. The nearest referral center for both adults and children is 90-minutes away by ground. The annual census of the emergency department is 15,000 patients per year, of which only 5% is pediatric. There are 2 hours left in your 12-hour shift and your energy is all but spent. You are looking forward to winding down at home after an extremely busy and high-acuity shift when your 35th patient of the day checks in. The patient’s chief complaint is fever. You give yourself an internal fist pump thinking that you’re about to see your 12th viral URI of the day and that you’ll be in-and-out of that room no in time. In the midst of your premature celebration you scan the nursing note and see the age of the patient: 6 weeks…You’re hopes of a quick and easy disposition suddenly melt away leaving you with many more questions regarding this patient’s care than answers…You muster your remaining energy and make your way toward the patient’s room.

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