Grand Rounds Recap 1/6

Grand Rounds Recap 1/6

Emergency KT Protocol - The Pharmacology of RSI with Drs. Dang and Renne

Who do we RSI? What do we use? We can be better than etomidate and succ and the protocol in development will drill into the details - here is an overview:

  • The most clinically useful categorization of RSI candidates is probably based on hemodynamics
  • Hemodynamically unstable patients can be classified as “shock" based on myriad criteria and/or clinician gestalt while patients in whom the adrenergic surge of laryngoscopy could potentiate their pathology (e.g., increased ICP, aortic dissection, active ACS, or hypertensive crisis, etc.) can be classified as “high risk hypertension” for patients with increased ICP
  • The hemodynamic classification of a patient determines his/her track down the pathway, but their classification can shift at any point based on clinician discretion (i.e., a well-resuscitated shock patient may later be considered “stable” and managed accordingly) 
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What Makes an Airway Difficult

What Makes an Airway Difficult

What Makes an Airway Difficult? In short, a lot of different factors play into making an airway difficult.  In general, they can be broken down into anatomicphysiologic, and logistic.  We'll cover some of the logistical issues that can complicate intubations on a later post (mostly with regards to intubation in the HEMS and prehospital  setting).

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