Pneumonia Alphabet Soup

Pneumonia Alphabet Soup

Pneumonia. It’s one of the first conditions we learn to diagnose as medical students. It was probably the cause of the first really sick, septic geriatric patient you saw in residency. Conversely you have also probably sent a fair share of patient’s home with an outpatient course of antibiotics and PCP follow-up.  While determining the appropriate treatment and disposition for patients on the extreme ends of illness severity is quite straight forward; that pesky majority in the middle can be a conundrum at times. Who can go home? Who needs broad spectrum? Who needs step-down? Over the last two decades there has been a smorgasbord of pneumonia related acronyms used in clinical practice to predict severity, guide therapeutics and recommend disposition. During our most recent resident Journal Club, we took a look at a handful of the more familiar acronyms as well as some new ones coming down the pipeline.

Read More

Grand Rounds Recap 7.5.17

Grand Rounds Recap 7.5.17

In our first Grand Rounds of the academic year, we started with Dr. Pancioli teaching us about the history of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Palmer discussed team work and the case for building social capital and Dr. LaFollette worked through the disposition of patients with chest pain. Our clinical pharmacist Chris Droege, PharmD discussed the evolving landscape of agents we have to reverse oral anticoagulants.

Read More

Antibiotics for Facial Fractures

Antibiotics for Facial Fractures

In the Emergency Department, we frequently encounter patient's with facial fractures and associated lacerations.  The orthopedic surgery literature strongly supports the use of antibiotics for open fractures.  The facial surgery literature, however, does not have extensive publications addressing the use of antibiotics in open facial fractures.  So what are we to do? Does every fracture get antibiotics? If not, which fractures?

Read More

Grand Rounds Recap 8.17.2016

Grand Rounds Recap 8.17.2016

This week included our first every chalk-talk about antibiotics focusing on beta-lactams. We had our quarterly AirCare grand rounds where we learned about some special tools we carry on the aircraft including point of care lab testing and specialized suction devices. We also did a high fidelity hemorrhagic shock simulation. In two case follow-ups we learned about some special considerations in ACS and for pregnant patients in trauma. Read on!

Read More