Annals of B-Pod: Summer Issue Is Here!

Annals of B-Pod: Summer Issue Is Here!

From minor care to major injuries, this Summer 2017 edition of Annals of B Pod goes beyond B Pod. Dr. Murphy starts off with a discussion of the learning points from his prehospital cricothyrotomy in this month's Air Care column. From B pod, Dr. Harty discusses the management of abdominal compartment syndrome. Dr. Golden tells of a case of acute HIV presenting as thrombocytopenia. Dr. Baez's procedure piece describes how to measure bladder pressure for patients at risk of elevated intra-abdominal pressures. From I pod, Dr. Banning describes the diagnosis and treatment of Lisfranc injuries. In the monthly pharmacy article, we discuss reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex. Finally, Dr. Scanlon describes de Winter's morphology in the EKG corner. 

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Annals of B-Pod: To Cric or Not to Cric?

Annals of B-Pod: To Cric or Not to Cric?

In this AirCare case, Dr. Murphy eloquently details his experience in managing something every emergency physician fears - the need for a crash airway in a patient with severe airway injuries. Dr. Murphy discusses both the technical evaluation of a patient for a potential cricothyrotomy as well as his personal thoughts and reflections following the procedure.

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Annals of B-Pod: Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

Annals of B-Pod: Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

While compartment syndrome of the extremities is a much feared complication - what happens when you get compartment syndrome of the abdomen? Does this mean you really shouldn't trust your gut? In this article, Dr. Harty discusses through the evaluation and management of abdominal compartment syndrome in this week's issue of Annals of B-Pod.

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Small Kids and Squiggle Lines - An Introduction to Pediatric EKG Interpretation

Small Kids and Squiggle Lines - An Introduction to Pediatric EKG Interpretation

It’s a typical shift in your community shop when you see a patient on the board that makes you nervous. 2 year old male with syncope. It’s been awhile since you have treated someone born in the 21st century and you know this child’s workup will likely involve an EKG. The closest pediatric hospital is 2 hours away.  How comfortable do you feel interpreting the squiggle lines generated by this little heart?

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Grand Rounds Recap 6.14.17

Grand Rounds Recap 6.14.17

Dr. Ventura discusses the value of head CT and risk factors of CNS complications in HIV. Dr. Goel discussing the cognitive biases that drive decision making in EM. Dr. Stettler taught us that framing feedback can be as important as giving it and finally our CCHMC colleagues run through some difficult tox and airway cases. Plenty of learning to go around this week!

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A Significant Clot

A Significant Clot

Last week our Journal Club focused on the treatment of hemodynamically significant pulmonary emboli.  These are pulmonary emboli causing either frank hypotension (sometimes called massive or high risk PEs) or causing significant right heart strain as evidenced by CT findings, cardiac biomarker elevation, or bedside Echo findings.  Drs. Grace Lagasse, Kari Gorder, and Claire O'Brien led us in a discussion of the 3 papers linked in the article.  Read the papers yourself, listen to the podcast, read the summaries and get caught up on all things PE.

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Liver Function Tests Decoded

Liver Function Tests Decoded

If the chief complaint of your patient is abdominal pain, altered mental status, overdose, generalized weakness chances are you at least considered ordering a hepatic panel. In fact, studies show that the hepatic panel is the third most common laboratory test ordered in the emergency department only behind the CBC and renal panel. If emergency medicine physicians are so quick to order this test, it is important to also know how to interpret all the little red arrows that often accompany your results. For this we will review each component and even (wait for it) … a little biochemistry!

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Grand Rounds Recap 5.24.2017

Grand Rounds Recap 5.24.2017

Grand Rounds kicked off this week with Dr. Axelson's final M&M of the year where we learned about hypertensive emergencies, 2nd & 3rd trimester vaginal bleeding, the care of the sick asthmatic, which bronchiolitics can go home and how exactly to treat the many forms of UTIs. Drs. Kircher and Murphy-Crews continued the learning with a case follow-up about intubating patients with airway stents and pediatric head injury, respectively. Our joint EM-Peds lecture rounded out the day with visual diagnoses in peds. 

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